Vol 4-3 Research Article

Perceptions of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Among Professionals Providing Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Jerrod Brown1,2,3*, Diane Harr1

1Concordia University, St. Paul, MN, USA

2Pathways Counseling Center, Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA

3American Institute for the Advancement of Forensic Studies, St. Paul, MN, USA

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are a major community health problem in the United States. Traumatic brain injury can result in disruption to normal brain functions and is caused by a bump, blow, or external damage to the head. Ranging from mild to severe in nature, TBIs can result in physical, cognitive, emotional, social, personality, adaptive, and behavioral changes in an individual. These devastating symptoms contribute to individuals with TBIs having the potential for a host of short and long-term issues. Traumatic brain injury can result in cognitive impairments, including disinhibition and risky decision-making behaviors, thus increasing the risk of substance abuse. Because many people do not have visible or physical signs, TBI can be difficult to screen, assess, and diagnose. Despite these difficulties, mental health and substance use disorder professionals can make a positive difference for clients with traumatic brain injury. As such, the current study examines the experiences and perceptions of TBI among treatment staff of Vinland National Center, a substance use disorder treatment facility in Minnesota. Results of this study raise awareness of the challenges of TBI in drug and alcohol treatment centers and offer tips, strategies, and solutions for professionals working with this clientele.

DOI: 10.29245/2572.942X/2019/3.1248 View / Download Pdf View Full Text