Welcome to the Journal of Neurology & Neuromedicine

Manuscript Guidelines

The journal has specific rules to formatting a manuscript that authors should adhere to before shipping their manuscript. These guidelines are primarily intended to make the submission of manuscript quick and easy.    Read More

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Ethics & Disclosures

Journal of Neurology and Neuromedicine is primarily based on values centered on loyalty, commitment, scientific accuracy, and ethics. It has adopted clear and rigorous ethical guidelines for best working practices.    Read More

What happens next to your Submission

Each article we publish benefits from hundreds of hours of work by Chief editors, Sectional editors, Reviewers, Manuscript editors, Proofreaders, Graphics and Web experts, who work to ensure that the manuscript meets our standards. Read More

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Focus & Scope


The overarching goal of the Journal of Neurology and Neuromedicine is to remain as a credible source of neurological sciences based information encompassing a variety of relevant areas such as clinical studies, cellular and molecular studies, disease mechanisms, diagnostic approaches, epidemiology, medical aspects, computational studies and treatment options of the most common neurobiological complexities with an emphasis on research that is genetically, structurally, physiologically and pathophysiologically relevant.

The integral part of our scholarly mission is to ensure the accuracy of journal quality in accord with the highest standards of professional ethics.

“Quality is our Priority.
It is the Foundation of our Publication"

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Recent Articles


Vol 4-2 Case Report
Vol 4-2 Review Article

Scientific Evaluation of EMDR Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Psychological Trauma Summary: Scientific evaluation of EMDR psychotherapy

F. Haour1*, E. Dobbelaere1,2, C. de Beaurepaire3

1EMDR France Association, 9 rue Papillon, 75009 Paris, France

2Université Paris 5, 75006 Paris, France

3EPS of Maison-Blanche, 6-10, Pierre-Bayle Street, 75020 Paris, France

DOI: 10.29245/2572.942X/2019/2.1234 View / Download Pdf View Full Text
Vol 4-2 Research Article

Gulf War Illness and Inflammation: Association of symptom severity with C-reactive protein

Lisa M. James1,2,3, Brian E. Engdahl1,2,4, Rachel A. Johnson1, Apostolos P. Georgopoulos1,2,3,4,5*

1Brain Sciences Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN, 5541, USA

2Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

3Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

4Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

5Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multi-system condition that has affected one-third of U.S. veterans who served in the Persian Gulf. Although GWI etiology remains unclear, mounting evidence points to immune system involvement and inflammation, in particular, as underlying the host of symptoms associated with the condition. Here we investigated the association between GWI symptoms and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, in 76 veterans with GWI. Results indicated a highly significant positive association between CRP and mean GWI symptom severity. At the symptom domain level, CRP was significantly and positively associated with Pain, Neurocognitive/Mood, Fatigue, and Respiratory symptom severity but not with Skin or Gastrointestinal symptom severity. These results support the premise that GWI symptoms, particularly those implicating brain involvement, are a result of neuroinflammation. The cause for inflammation is not known. We have hypothesized that at the root of GWI are harmful persistent antigens stemming from environmental exposures associated with service during the Gulf War that could not be successfully eliminated due to lack of specific immunity1,2. Work is underway in our laboratory to identify and eliminate persistent antigens in veterans with GWI which we anticipate will result in reduced inflammation and reduced GWI symptoms.

DOI: 10.29245/2572.942X/2019/2.1245 View / Download Pdf View Full Text
Vol 4-2 Commentary

"Commentary: Alcohol Consumption Impairs the Ependymal Cilia Motility in the Brain Ventricles"

Hannah C. Saternos1 and Wissam A. AbouAlaiwi1*

1University of Toledo, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Toledo, Ohio, USA

DOI: 10.29245/2572.942X/2019/2.1250 View / Download Pdf View Full Text
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